Abstract Submission Categories and Details

Proposed sessions soliciting abstracts are listed below.  Please see the abstract submission guidelines for details on submitting your abstract. 

*Biomaterials Technology in Industry*

In recognition of the fact that speakers from industry need to protect their intellectual property, it is understood that some technical details cannot be disclosed. SFB is once again soliciting abstracts for “Biomaterials Technology in Industry” sessions that will relax some of the typically rigorous scientific requirements for these specific sessions.  Abstracts submitted to categories within the BIOMATERIALS TECHNOLOGY IN INDUSTRY track (annotated with a *BTI* on the abstract category submission list) will be subject to loosened requirements.  In recognition that speakers from industry need to protect their intellectual property, it is understood that some technical details cannot be disclosed. “Biomaterials Technology in Industry” abstracts should:

  • Comply with the financial interest disclosures required of all authors;
  • Follow the standard abstract submission template, with allowable relaxation of the typically rigorous "methods" section, as appropriate to ensure that proprietary information is not compromised;
  • Summarize the information the author intends to convey during the session;
  • May be purposely vague in areas that concern proprietary information;
  • Not be commercially driven, and should not promote specific products, or make product claims.

NOTE: These sessions will be specifically delineated as distinct from the Scientific Program of the Annual Meeting with the loosened requirements articulated ubiquitously.

Complete List of Categories for Abstract Submission:

Biomaterials Technology in Industry
4th SFB Business Plan Competition *BTI*
Assays to Evaluate Cell and Tissue Interactions with Biomaterials *BTI*
Biocompatibility Evaluations - Risk, Tests and New Technology *BTI*
From Conception to Clinical Trial: Examples of Technology Development *BTI*
Translating Biomaterials for Regenerative Engineering *BTI*

3D Printing
3D Bioprinting for Medical Applications
Fabrication and 3D Printing of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

Cancer
Cancer Nanotechnology

Cardiovascular
Biomaterials for Cardiovascular Regeneration
Current Approaches to Treat Cardiovascular Calcification
Local Drug Delivery to Cardiovascular Targets
Materials for Cardiovascular Devices, and Blood Compatibility
Smart Hydrogels for Cardiovascular Therapy

Cells/Microenvironments
Biomaterials and Scaffolds for Interfacial Tissue Engineering
Biomaterials Platforms for Scaffold-Free Tissue Engineering
Engineered Biomaterials for Neural Applications
Engineered Microenvironments in to Model Disease
Enzyme-Assisted Biomaterials Fabrication and Modification for Biological Applications
Harnessing Matrix Biology to Control Cell Fate: A Guest Symposium Sponsored by the American Society for Matrix Biology

Dental
Appoaches to Accelerate Development of Novel Dental Biomaterials: Predictive Tools to Characterize Long-Term Durability, Safety and Effectiveness
Racing for the Surface: Recent Development in Antimicrobial and Osteoinductive Biomaterials

Drug Delivery
Therapeutic Strategies for the Treatment of Infectious Diseases
Supramolecular Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery, Imaging, and Immunoengineering
Local Drug, Protein, and Gene Delivery from Implant Surfaces and Coatings

General Biomaterials
Biomaterial Technologies for Hemostasis and Wound Care
Biomaterial Technologies for Precision Medicine
Glycomaterials
Implantable Bioelectronics
Intelligent Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications (Joint Symposium with Korean Society for Biomaterials) 
Supramolecular Design of Network Biomaterials
Translation of Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Clinical X-Ray Imaging Modalities

Immune Engineering
3D and Microfluidic Technologies for Immunoengineering
Biomaterial-Mediated Control of Immunity for Regenerative Medicine
Next-Generation Biomaterials for Islet Delivery and Immune Acceptance for Diabetes

Neural Application
Engineered Biomaterials for Neural Applications

Orthopaedics
Advancement of Methodology to Augment Bioactive Performance of Calcium Phosphate-based Biomaterials
Bioactive Glasses and Ceramics
Biomaterials and Scaffolds for Interfacial Tissue Engineering
Novel Biomaterials for Spine Implant Applications
Polymeric Devices in Orthopaedic Applications
Racing for the Surface: Recent Development in Antimicrobial and Osteoinductive Biomaterials

Special Interest Group
Biomaterials Education
Biomaterials and Medical Products Commercialization
Biomaterial-Tissue Interaction
Cardiovascular Biomaterials
Dental/Craniofacial Biomaterials
Drug Delivery
Engineering Cells and Their Microenvironments
Immune Engineering
Nanomaterials
Ophthalmic Biomaterials
Orthopaedic Biomaterials
Protein and Cells at Interfaces
Surface Characterization and Modification
Tissue Engineering

Tissue Engineering
Biomaterials for Cardiovascular Regeneration
Biomaterial-Mediated Control of Immunity for Regenerative Medicine
Biomaterials for Regenerative Engineering Applications
Development and Manufacture of Silk-Based Tissue Engineered Devices: From Basic Systems to Clinical Use
Next-Generation Biomaterials for Islet Delivery and Immune Acceptance for Diabetes

Biomaterials Technology in Industry (BTI)


4th SFB Business Plan Competition
Students and post docs: Medical technology requires more than just laboratory results to become a reality. Do you believe that your biomaterials-based research innovation has the potential to succeed in the medical device industry? Put your skills to the test in this unique session designed to challenge you to consider the commercialization aspects of your research. Individuals and groups (your choice) will be judged by experts from investing, industry, regulatory, and academia on the strength of their commercialization plans. Prizes will be awarded to the top teams, including audience’s choice. To participate, submit an abstract that contains your Executive Summary, including information on your technology, the market, and the commercialization strategy. Those selected will give a 10 minute pitch followed by Q&A “Shark Tank” style from judges and audience. Visit biomaterials.org to download complete instructions on how to submit your abstract.


From Conception to Clinical Trial: Examples of Technology Development
The session seeks to illustrate the entire development cycle of biomaterials-based technologies from conception to the clinic. The aim is to give the audience perspective on the development process through specific examples with supporting data. Presenters from industry and academia/healthcare settings are welcome. Talks may be of extended duration (20 mins) and could be presented by a single speaker or two speakers (a scientist/engineer and a clinician to separately present the pre-clinical and clinical outcomes).


Translating Biomaterials for Regenerative Engineering
Regenerative engineering aims to develop functional, bioactive, and instructive biomaterials for regeneration of damaged or injured tissues. Bioactivity can be engineered into biomaterials by functionalization with proteins, peptides, small molecules as well as by biophysical cues such as surface topography or alignment. This symposium will highlight recent trends in development of bioactive biomaterials that play active role in controlling cellular behaviors such as growth, alignment and differentiation. We will include different classes of biomaterials such as proteins, polysaccharides, synthetic polymers, fibers, metals, ceramics, and hydrogels for applications in regenerative engineering. Translational strategies for taking these biomaterials from ‘Bench to Bedside’ will also be discussed during the symposium.


Biocompatibility Evaluations – Risks, Tests and New Technology
Biocompatibility Evaluation is evolving.  Risk based approaches allow evaluations based on knowledge of chemical composition and toxicology to substitute for direct biological testing.  New test methods are allowing transition from traditional animal models to more sophisticated in vitro/tissue culture systems.

This Symposium will explore modern approaches to biological evaluation - including the current revisions of the ISO 10993 standards which reflect these new paradigms.  The symposium will also explore the science of biological evaluation – showcasing new approaches to in vitro testing and where chemistry is more sensitive and predictive than biology.  Speakers will be drawn from the leading experts in the ISO technical drafting committee for ISO 10993 as well as researchers developing new methods for biological and chemical testing of biomaterials.


Assays to Evaluate Cell and Tissue Interactions with Biomaterials
The regenerative medicine industry has identified a lack of reliable methods to characterize tissue engineered products as “possibly the single greatest challenge for the field”.  The goal of this symposium is to feature talks that educate attendees regarding best practices for tissue engineering related assays. Abstracts that describe best practices to characterize aspects of cell biomaterial interactions including measurements of nerve, muscle, cartilage or tendon regeneration, antibacterial effects, cell characterization and genetic modification procedures are sought.  The invited speaker will focus on how reliable assays are required to bring new products to market and how participating in standards writing through organizations such as the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) assist in this process.  Abstracts that describe assays that are not yet published standards, but could play a critical role in discerning quality of tissue engineered/regenerative medicine will be given priority.

3D Printing


Fabrication and 3D Printing of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

The field of tissue engineering relies extensively on the use of 3D scaffolds to provide the appropriate microenvironment for tissue regeneration. This session will focus on the state-of-the-art technologies including 3D printing and related methods in the development of biomimetic materials and scaffolds and the application of these scaffolds to modulate desirable cellular responses and various tissue regeneration.


3D Bioprinting for Medical Applications

3D bioprinting is becoming widely investigated to fabricate cell-laden biomaterials and medical devices for biomedical applications.  Despite this interest, limited progress has been made using 3D bioprinting as a device fabrication tool for clinical applications.  This is mainly due to the lack of progress in development of novel bioprinting approaches and bioinks to create self-supporting structures with relevant scales.  This session will focus on novel 3D bioprinting approaches and bioink materials.

Cancer


Cancer Nanotechnology

The cellular and therapeutic aspects of nanotechnology as it applies to the cancer will be covered under this session. The session would solicit abstracts from the biomaterial community working on the application of nano-biomaterial technologies to cancer. Nanomaterials used for the detection and treatment of cancer affect the translation of nanotechnology for cancer therapy.  The field of nanotechnology translates clinically into the field of nanomedicine.  Thus, the field of nanomedicine is affected by upcoming nanotechnologies although may not be directly covered by this session.  Cancer detection at the nanoscale requires nanotechnologies such as quantum dots and these types of technologies are covered by this session.  The cellular and extracellular make-up of cancer and its milieu detection, characterization, and treatment as linked to nanotechnologies are applicable areas for this session.

Cardiovascular


Smart Hydrogels for Cardiovascular Therapy

Smart hydrogels are attractive biomaterials for cardiovascular therapies due to their responsiveness to the microenvironment of diseased tissues, ease of delivery, and flexibility for in vitro processing. Smart hydrogels have been designed to respond to temperature, pH, reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxygen level, enzymes, or cytokines in the tissues. They can be degraded by hydrolysis or enzymes. Smart hydrogels have been used alone, or as carriers for drugs, proteins, growth factors or cells for myocardial and vascular regeneration. The hydrogels in liquid form can be delivered into tissues simply by injection. When the hydrogels are processed into 3D scaffolds by techniques like phase separation and 3D printing, they can be implanted by open surgery. This symposium will allow presenters to share their current advances in using smart hydrogels for cardiovascular therapy.


Current Approaches to Treat Cardiovascular Calcification

Cardiovascular calcification is a common complication of heart disease and increases patient mortality. Calcification reduces arterial elastance and impairs valve function. Treatments for both arterial and valvular calcification are limited and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. This session will cover new approaches to treat calcification in arteries and valves.


Materials for Cardiovascular Devices, and Blood Compatibility

Thrombosis is often a major concern with cardiovascular medical devices such as stents, vascular grafts, heart valves, pacemakers, defibrillators, ventricular assist devices, cardiopulmonary bypass, and artificial heart. Although significant progress has been made in developing and using a wide variety of metallic, polymeric, ceramic, and natural biomaterials for making cardiovascular medical devices, still the blood compatibility of these devices remains an issue. This symposium will focus on (i) recent developments in cardiovascular biomaterials for improving blood compatibility; (ii) the development of novel biomaterials for cardiovascular medical device applications; (iii) novel coatings and surface modification technologies for improving blood compatibility; (iv) recent developments in in vitro and in vivo evaluation of blood compatibility of biomaterials and medical devices; (v) clinical evaluation of cardiovascular medical devices; (vi) novel approaches to improve endothelialization of cardiovascular implants and devices.


Local Drug Delivery to Cardiovascular Targets

Local drug eluting stents highlight the potential for local drug delivery to revolutionize vascular medicine. The challenge now is to develop equally effective local drug therapies for more complex lesions (e.g. diabetes and calcification), peripheral vascular beds and the heart. The proposed session will provide a venue for presenting new ideas and technologies aimed at locally delivering drugs to cardiovascular targets, including polymer free drug eluting stents, drug coated balloons, nanoparticle, microspheres, liposomes, and hydrogels. Presentations highlighting new insights into existing technologies and new technologies are particularly encouraged.


Biomaterials for Cardiovascular Regeneration

In recent years, significant effort has been devoted to developing efficient therapeutic strategies for repair and regeneration of cardiovascular injures. In this regard, biomaterials have played an imperative role in successful delivery of cells and therapeutic compounds as well as in engineering of native like cardiovascular tissue substitutes.

To develop proper treatment strategies for CVD, some of the challenges include vascularization of synthetic tissues, renewable cell sources, biomaterials that have similar features to the native cardiovascular tissues, and efficacy in preclinical models. In this session, we will include topics ranging from emerging biomaterials, strategies of vascularization of engineered constructs, and advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering that have shown progress in preclinical settings.

Cells/Microenvironments


Harnessing Matrix Biology to Control Cell Fate: A Guest Symposium Sponsored by the American Society for Matrix Biology

Many subfields within the biomaterials community routinely employ the use of extracellular matrix (ECM) based materials for a variety of purposes, including cell and tissue engineering.  ASMB members focus on understanding basic biochemical properties of ECM components in addition to characterizing cellular responses to ECM proteins. The goal of this symposium is to facilitate interactions between biomaterial scientists with synergistic communities that focus on ECM biology.  This session invites presentations from researchers in the field that describe biochemical and mechanical properties of ECM components, cell-ECM interactions, and application of ECM-based materials to engineered cellular microenvironments.


Engineered Microenvironments in to Model Disease

Biomaterials have been invaluable tools for understanding how cells respond to their microenvironment in both health and disease. Here, we invite contributions that develop biomaterial platforms for cell culture or tissue engineering. Session topics include the following: understanding of the mechanisms that determine cellular responses to disease/injury, determining how biophysical and biochemical cues alter cellular behavior in 3D, identifying differences between 2D and 3D microenvironments in mediating cellular phenotype or response to treatment, developing complex tissue microstructures/organioids, culturing multiple types of cells within complex microenvironments, driving or enriching specific populations, developing improved approaches for utilization of patient derived or difficult to culture cells, drug screening within engineered microenvironments, and engineering microenvironments for therapeutic purposes.


Enzyme-assisted Biomaterial Fabrication and Modification for Biological Applications

Enzymes play critical roles in regulating cellular functions and cell-matrix interactions. Due to their substrate specificity and reaction efficiency, enzymatic reactions are increasingly explored for biomaterials fabrication and modification in a myriad of biomedical applications. This symposium will focus on exploiting specific and efficient enzymatic reactions to fabricate and/or modify biomaterials with preferential properties. Emphasis of the symposium will be on the design principles and novel use of enzymes to prepare/modify fibers, films, hydrogels, scaffolds, particles, or other materials with biologically relevant applications.


Biomaterials Platforms for Scaffold-free Tissue Engineering

The focus of this session is on the fabrication of cell-dense constructs using approaches such as cell sheet engineering or aggregation of modular micro-tissues. For many applications, the use of synthetic scaffolds to guide tissue architecture is not suitable because they reduce cell density and limit cell-cell interactions; instead, cell-based bottom up approaches enable greater cell fractions and rely on the principles of self-assembly and pre-organized building blocks. Micro- and nano-engineered biomaterials platforms that guide the formation and organization of tissue modules will be highlighted.


Engineered biomaterials for Neural Applications

Researchers are constantly developing and applying new biomaterials to challenging problems of the peripheral and central nervous systems. Engineered biomaterials are uniquely positioned for use in creating, testing, and regenerating neural tissue for better in vitro models of injury and disease, therapeutic treatments, understanding neural development, and mapping the brain. This session will focus on cutting edge research in neural biomaterials including fundamental material development through pre-clinical studies.  These include big questions surrounding diseases and injuries spanning neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and Schwann cells. Presentations will be highly interdisciplinary at the interfaces of biology, chemistry, materials science, engineering, and neuroscience. Target applications of these materials include neural injury, neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, diagnostics, brain-machine interfaces, and brain cancer.


Biomaterials and Scaffolds for Interfacial Tissue Engineering

Musculoskeletal tissue interfaces are complex, heterogeneous tissues in which the specific spatial composition is tightly linked to biological function. Biomaterials for interfacial tissue engineering must therefore be designed to guide biomimetic tissue organization to regenerate functional constructs. This session will focus on novel biomaterials-based strategies to regenerate musculoskeletal interfaces with particular attention to approaches to control the spatial organization of chemical and/or physical cues to direct cell and tissue response locally and globally within a scaffold. These include advanced scaffold fabrication, biochemical functionalization, scaffold-cell interactions, physical and structural cues, spatial growth factor control, and stem cell lineage commitment for musculoskeletal tissue interface regeneration.

Dental


Approaches to Accelerate Development of Novel Dental Biomaterials: Predictive Tools to Characterize Long-Term Durability, Safety and Effectiveness

The goal of ongoing research and development in novel dental biomaterials is to achieve superior material properties, biocompatibility and durability in the oral environment over currently used restorative and implantable systems. Development of the next generation high-quality dental biomaterials requires integrative approaches with measurement capabilities and assurance strategies to characterize physical, chemical and biological properties for short- and long-term predictions of performance. This session will provide a forum for scientists, engineers, clinical professionals, and industrial researchers to discuss recent technical advances that enable quantitative and predictive in-vitro and invivo safety and effectiveness evaluations across the product development cycle targeting clinical translation. Special emphasis will be given to discuss challenges and future directions of sensitive measurement technologies and data-driven frameworks that provide critical and clinically relevant insights to improve the design, safety and effectiveness of novel dental biomaterials in terms of biocompatibility, shelf-life, clinical usability, bond preservation, durability/service-life, and scale-up manufacturing.


Racing for the Surface: Recent Development in Antimicrobial and Osteoinductive Biomaterials
It is well known that bacteria and host cells race for the surfaces of implants. This symposium will cover topics related to antimicrobial biomaterials (e.g., antibiotics, antimicrobial peptides, vaccines, immunotherapeutic approaches, etc.), antimicrobial coatings, antimicrobial delivery vehicles, and osteoconductive and osteoinductive biomaterials (e.g., hydroxyapatite, BMP, etc.), as well as research integrating both antimicrobial and osteoinductive/osteoconductive properties. Antibiotic resistance, which shifts the race toward bacteria, and strategies to reduce antibiotic resistance will also be sought. It is expected that the past, present, and future of antimicrobial and osteoinductive biomaterials will be presented by well-respected researchers in the fields.

Drug Delivery


Therapeutic Strategies for the Treatment of Infectious Diseases

Greater than 25% of deaths worldwide are caused by infectious diseases.  Rising drug resistance and lack in development of new classes of therapeutics have made it increasingly difficult to treat infections.  There is a pressing need to engineer advanced antimicrobial therapeutics, delivery systems, and diagnostics that can rapidly and effectively treat and detect infections, while helping to control the spread of resistance.  This session will focus on recent advances spanning industry and academia in novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of bacterial, fungal, viral, and biofilm associated infections. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: antimicrobial surfaces and device coatings, novel antimicrobial molecules and macromolecules, antimicrobial nano- and micro-particles, and triggered, targeted, and responsive antimicrobial delivery systems. Given the critical importance of detecting infectious agents prior to treating them, new diagnostic technologies for infectious agents are also of interest.


Supramolecular Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery, Imaging, and Immunoengineering

Due to the versatility and diversity of their materials properties, a wide range of biomedical applications have emerged in recent years using supramolecular nanomaterials. The bottom-up approach to designing functional objects at the nanoscale has been used to develop individual nanoparticles or to produce highly oriented complexes for a growing number of applications including drug delivery, imaging, theranostics, vaccines, and cancer immunotherapy. In addition, there are exciting opportunities for local therapeutic modulation. This session highlights recent advances in nanomaterials design aimed to enhance the in vivo delivery of therapeutic or imaging payloads for a variety of diseases including those affecting the skin, gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, cardiovascular system, cancer, and other diseased tissues.


Local Drug, Protein, and Gene Delivery from Implant Surfaces and Coatings

This general session will focus on the recent advances in locally delivering drugs, proteins, peptides, growth factors, enzymes, and genes from implant surfaces and coatings. Such drug and biomolecule releasing coatings have tremendous applications in cardiovascular devices, orthopedic and fracture fixation devices, craniofacial and dental implants, ophthalmic implants, cochlear implants, and neural devices. This session will cover a wide range of drug and biomolecule eluting implant coatings that include but not limited to novel biodegradable, biostable, and biological polymer coatings, ceramic coatings, porous, textured, microrough, and reservoir surfaces, organic and molecular coatings, selfassembly coatings, solgel coatings, biodegradable metal coatings, thin films, biological and biomimetic coatings. This session will also highlight the importance of different surface characterization techniques to analyze the drug delivery coatings. A special emphasis will be provided to the implant coating technologies that have been translated into clinical and preclinical products.

General Biomaterials


Intelligent Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications (Joint symposium with Korean Society for Biomaterials)

Intelligent hydrogels have immense significance  for a wide range of biomedical applications. For example, injectable and biodegradable hydrogels have shown great promise not only as space filling materials by themselves, but also as noninvasive carriers for delivery of bioactive molecules or therapeutic cell sources. Furthermore, polymers with shear thinning properties have been combined with 3D printing techniques, which are advanced to print a 3D structure with living cells (so called bioprinting), demonstrating great potential to build functional tissues for the replacement of damaged organs. In addition, the hydrogels have been delicately designed to modulate a specific niche environment for stem cells, which are now used for improved cell therapy and personalized diagnostics. This symposium is aimed to overview state of art research on the synthesis and characterization of intelligent hydrogel systems, and their applications on drug delivery and tissue engineering. This symposium is coorganized by the Korean Society for Biomaterials that will host the World Biomaterials Congress (WBC) 2024. This annual symposium will become a bridge for a long term relationship and mutual benefits for both Society members by promoting cooperation, collaboration, and networking.


Supramolecular Design of Network Biomaterials

The preparation of biomaterials using rationally designed motifs rooted in supramolecular chemistry (i.e., “chemistry beyond the molecule”) affords properties that are reversible, highly tunable, and dynamic, and as such has become an exciting new direction in the field of engineered biomaterials. The reliance on specific, noncovalent interactions affords opportunities in developing materials with “smart” functionality and activity that can be tuned in response to disease or application, and as injectable surrogate matrices for cells. Moreover, conserving the specific supramolecular motif realizes a modular approach to customize a biomaterial in a patient or disease specific way. These efforts have resulted in a suite of new and highly functional network biomaterials for applications in stem cell biology, regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and drug delivery. In each case, unique features rooted in supramolecular design give rise to important emergent properties.


Implantable Bioelectronics

Bioelectronics, electronics designed to interface with biology, are an important class of biomaterials that are gaining significant interest. Clinical successes in implantable bioelectronics include pacemakers, blood glucose monitoring, and recording and stimulating neural probes, but these still face issues of longterm biocompatibility and device function. There have also been great advances in the next generation of intracorporeal bioelectronics which are small, soft, flexible, bioresorbable and biocompatible and which have applications ranging from electrophysiology, manipulating cell behavior and tissue growth, biosensing, drug delivery and optogenetics. The focus of this session will be on what the field can learn from existing implantable platforms and what are their remaining challenges as well as what exciting new in vivo bioelectronic technologies are on the horizon.


Biomaterial Technologies for Precision Medicine

As the demand for precision medicine continues to rise, the “one size fits all” approach to the design of medical devices and therapies to treating specific diseases and injuries is becoming increasingly outdated. Biomaterials have significant potential for transforming precision medicine, and individual patient complexity often necessitates integrating multiple functions into a single device to successfully tailor personalized therapies. In this session, we seek to highlight the latest research in biomaterials based technologies that enable precision medicine, such as implantable devices for the in situ, real-time analysis of a patient’s condition or customized devices or material chemistries that adapt to a specific patient’s biology. We aim for our session to demonstrate that biomaterials-based technologies may address limitations to current approaches in precision medicine and may allow for more personalized therapies for patients.


Translation of Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Clinical X-Ray Imaging Modalities

Iodine and barium sulfate have been the only radiographic contrast agents used in clinical medicine for more than 50 years.  However, developments in targeted nanoparticle imaging probes over last decade have brought about a renaissance in X-ray contrast media with potential to transform computed tomography into a molecular imaging modality. This session will highlight translational research on nanoparticle imaging probes for radiography, mammography, CT, dual-energy CT, and spectral (multi-energy) CT. Emphasis will be placed on the fundamental biomaterials science underlying the design and synthesis of nanoparticle imaging probes, their performance in imaging phantoms and preclinical models, and prospects for clinical and commercial translation.


Biomaterial Technologies for Hemostasis and Wound Care

Stopping bleeding (hemostasis) and providing short and long-term wound care via passive and/or bioactive mechanisms is an important area of biomaterials-based technologies and includes external, intracavitary and intravascular hemostats, dressings, powders, foams, fibers and gels.  The goal of this session is to highlight recent advances in hemostatic biomaterials and to facilitate discussion of best practices for moving hemostatic technologies from the benchtop to the clinic.  The proposed session will invite presentations from researchers in this field that discuss biomaterials design, structure-property-function relationships, and achieved/ongoing/future visions of technology translation pathways.  An emphasis will be placed on translational aspects of hemostatic technologies.


Glycomaterials

Carbohydrates, including monosaccharides, oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and their conjugates, are major components of all living organisms that play a central role in numerous normal and pathological processes. Thus, carbohydrates are gaining interest as both targets and bioactive components of therapeutics and diagnostics for various biomedical and biotechnological applications. Carbohydrate-containing biomaterials (i.e. "glycomaterials") are receiving particular attention because they provide unique opportunities to mimic the multivalent carbohydrate presentation in native glycoconjugates that is often central to carbohydrate function within living systems. This session will highlight recent advances in the synthesis, characterization, and use of glycomaterials to interrogate and harness the biological activity of carbohydrates for biomedical and biotechnological applications. Particular emphasis will be placed on synthetic glycomaterials to probe glycocalyx function, modulate lectin activity, and engage the immune system for infection prophylaxis and immunotherapy.

Immune Engineering


3D and Microfluidic Technologies for Immunoengineering

Engineering functional lymphoid organs ex vivo or in vivo requires sophisticated approaches using 3D or microfluidic technologies to recapitulate complex and dynamic interactions between immune cells and their environments. This session focuses on such emerging biomaterials-based strategies and technologies including hydrogel, organoid culture, surface micro-patterning, micro- and nanoparticles, and microfluidic devices that enable controlled and dynamic activation, modulation, proliferation, and differentiation of immune cells and other related cell types for therapeutic applications as well as scientific discovery.


Biomaterial-Mediated Control of Immunity for Regenerative Medicine

Previous strategies to control biomaterial-immune cell interactions involved inhibition of or hiding from immunity. With increasing understanding of the importance of the immune system in mediating tissue repair, next-generation strategies are designed to actively stimulate specific immune cells or promote specific processes in the immune system in order to enhance tissue regeneration. This session will focus on biomaterial design and/or drug delivery strategies to actively control immunity for regenerative medicine applications. Cell targets include neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, and B cells. Biomaterial strategies include drug/cytokine delivery, structural biomimicry, nanomaterials, and tissue engineering strategies.


Next-Generation Biomaterials for Islet Delivery and Immune Acceptance for Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas are destroyed. Transplantation of pancreatic islet cells isolated from donors has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, this strategy is severely limited by islet loss due to inflammation, inadequate blood supply, and immune rejection. Biomaterial technologies are absolutely critical to the successful widespread application of islet transplantation in humans. This symposium will focus on novel biomaterials and technologies to improve islet survival and function. Examples include (i) new immune-directing encapsulating polymers, (ii) materials delivering immunomodulatory agents, and (iii) biomaterials addressing hypoxia, inflammation, and vascularization.

Neural Applications


Engineered biomaterials for Neural Applications

Researchers are constantly developing and applying new biomaterials to challenging problems of the peripheral and central nervous systems. Engineered biomaterials are uniquely positioned for use in creating, testing, and regenerating neural tissue for better in vitro models of injury and disease, therapeutic treatments, understanding neural development, and mapping the brain. This session will focus on cutting edge research in neural biomaterials including fundamental material development through pre-clinical studies.  These include big questions surrounding diseases and injuries spanning neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and Schwann cells. Presentations will be highly interdisciplinary at the interfaces of biology, chemistry, materials science, engineering, and neuroscience. Target applications of these materials include neural injury, neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, diagnostics, brain-machine interfaces, and brain cancer.

Orthopaedic


Advancement of Methodology to Augment Bioactive Performance of Calcium Phosphate-based Biomaterials

Recent progress of calcium phosphate-based biomaterials will be discussed from the view point of increasing their bioactivity, such as osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity using calcium phosphate micro and nano particles, using advanced technologies. Micro and nano calcium phosphate materials, including hydroxyapatite (HA), carbonate apatite (CO3-Ap), β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP), have been recognized as functional materials in not only bone tissue engineering but also in antibacterial treatment in bone tissues and gene transfection of mesenchymal stem cells. Symposium could be given by material scientists, chemists and medical/dental researchers and related scientists and focused on the recent advancement of the methodology to augment bioactive performance of calcium phosphate-based biomaterials.


Bioactive Glasses and Ceramics

Coming Soon


Biomaterials and Scaffolds for Interfacial Tissue Engineering

Musculoskeletal tissue interfaces are complex, heterogeneous tissues in which the specific spatial composition is tightly linked to biological function. Biomaterials for interfacial tissue engineering must therefore be designed to guide biomimetic tissue organization to regenerate functional constructs. This session will focus on novel biomaterials-based strategies to regenerate musculoskeletal interfaces with particular attention to approaches to control the spatial organization of chemical and/or physical cues to direct cell and tissue response locally and globally within a scaffold. These include advanced scaffold fabrication, biochemical functionalization, scaffold-cell interactions, physical and structural cues, spatial growth factor control, and stem cell lineage commitment for musculoskeletal tissue interface regeneration.


Polymeric Devices in Orthopaedic Applications
There is lack of knowledge in the general biomaterials community about what materials are widely used in medical devices. The information over decades of polymeric devices that have been used in the body can not only inform the larger community about the types of considerations to be taken into account when designing biomaterials but also can focus on the challenges we face in these applications currently. Polymeric devices used in orthopaedics include UHMWPE joint bearing surfaces, bone cements, PEEK spinal cages, cervical arthroplasty materials, non-degradable and degradable sutures, and some drug delivery devices. An overview of the rationale in the design characteristics of these materials, the in vivo experience (function and biology) and current challenges/future directions would be the topic of this session.


Novel Biomaterials for Spine Implant Applications
New biomaterials are being developed with specific application for the special needs of spine implants.  This symposium will explore the biomaterials topics that are most relevant to increasing success rates of spinal implants.  A leading biomaterials researcher in the spine implant space will lead off the symposium with presentation of recent developments that are currently of great interest to the spine implant community.  Abstracts submitted for this session could range from material surface characteristics to enhance bonding of bone to testing of specific spinal implant designs. Six abstracts will be selected for presentation with a panel discussion including all speakers at the end of the session.  This session will be relevant for presenters and attendees from basic science research to industry.

Special Interest Group


Biomaterials Education SIG

The Education SIG is soliciting abstracts pertaining to education and professional development.  From teaching and learning, to new approaches in knowledge transfer and implementation of innovative ideas.  Studies around bridging the gap between classroom theory and clinical application and hastening translation are also welcome. 


Biomaterials and Medical Products Commercialization SIG

The Biomaterials and Medical Products Commercialization SIG session seeks abstracts on the topics of translational research, pivotal animal studies, clinical trials, manufacturing and automation, alternatives to traditional testing (e.g. simulation), regulatory science, technology transfer,and entrepreneurship, as well as other subjects related to biomaterials and medical device commercialization efforts.


Biomaterial-Tissue Interaction SIG

The Biomaterial-Tissue Interaction SIG session will consider abstracts that investigate, in vitro and in vivo, the effects of biomaterial properties, characteristics or modifications on molecular, cellular, and physiological process. These events initiate with specific interactions between biomaterials and biological molecules present in tissues after biomaterial implantation, followed by cell recognition and activation of cellular processes such as cell attachment, proliferation, activation, polarization, differentiation, and necrosis. Understanding these events is the purpose of the Biomaterial-Tissue Interaction (BTI) Special Interest Group.


Cardiovascular Biomaterials SIG

Cardiovascular therapies harness biomaterials for optimizing biocompatibility, releasing drugs and as scaffolds for tissue regeneration. The session will provide a forum for research on the development and assessment of cardiovascular biomaterial applications across this entire spectrum.


Dental/Craniofacial Materials SIG

The Dental/Craniofacial Materials SIG session focuses on the basic, applied, and clinical research of innovative biomaterials ranging from synthetic to biological origins. These bio-inspired materials are designed to repair dental/craniofacial tissue structures, restore their functions, and/or regenerate these tissues using tissue engineering approaches. Recent advances in dental biomaterial technologies include advanced bio-inspired inorganic, organic, and composite nanomaterials, controlled drug delivery strategies, surface modification, and 3D printing technology.


Drug Delivery SIG

The Drug Delivery SIG session will consider abstracts that fall with the broad areas of therapeutic development, formulation, and application testing.  Drug delivery from medical devices, tissue engineering scaffolds/hydrogels, films, microparticles, nanoparticles, environmentally responsive materials, and other types of biomaterial assemblies are all invited.  Studies testing drug targeting, drug combinations, and drug/cell combinations are all also welcomed to submit.  Drug delivery application areas of interest include but are not limited to regenerative medicine/tissue engineering, cell and tissue transplant, cardiovascular stents and other devices, cancer, microbial infection, and autoimmune diseases.


Engineering Cells and Their Microenvironments SIG 

The Dental/Craniofacial Materials SIG session focuses on the basic, applied, and clinical research of innovative biomaterials ranging from synthetic to biological origins. These bio-inspired materials are designed to repair dental/craniofacial tissue structures, restore their functions, and/or regenerate these tissues using tissue engineering approaches. Recent advances in dental biomaterial technologies include advanced bio-inspired inorganic, organic, and composite nanomaterials, controlled drug delivery strategies, surface modification, and 3D printing technology.


Immune Engineering SIG

The  Immune Engineering SIG is soliciting abstracts that deal with engineered biomaterials for the development of immunotherapeutics and immune microenvironment engineering, to uncover fundamental mechanisms of immunobiology, and for systems immunology.


Nanomaterials SIG

The nanoscience and nanotechnology of biomaterials involves the unique science and technology present in biomaterials at the nanoscale and their related biological effects. Such nanobiomaterials  present the creation of new and better biomaterials and devices, diagnostics and therapeutics for biomedical applications. 


Ophthalmic Biomaterials SIG

The Ophthalmic Biomaterials SIG Session welcomes submissions that describe the development and/or testing of biomaterials for use in ophthalmology. This may include drug delivery strategies or cell-based approaches, regenerative medicine applications, or unique animal models that have a primary focus in preserving or restoring the form and/or function of the eye. Abstracts from related areas of research with strong applicability in the visual system may also be submitted for this SIG Session. 


Orthopaedic Biomaterials SIG

Orthopaedic biomaterials may include all kinds of biomaterials for orthopaedic applications (e.g., bone implant/scaffold, 3D printing, drug delivery) and related biological effects. Such biomaterials may include metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, coatings, biodegradables, etc.


Protein and Cells at Interfaces SIG

The goal of this broad session is to advance the understanding of cell and protein interactions with natural and synthetic biomaterials. Recent advances related to the mechanistic interactions with existing biomaterials and the design of new materials to produce targeted responses by proteins and cells are encouraged. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: 1) relating surface chemistry to protein adsorption or specific binding; 2) studying the activation or inactivation of protein function at interfaces, including complement activation; 3) the response of cells to materials with varied chemistries, mechanical properties and micro- or nano-structured surfaces; 4) the evaluation of cell and tissue responses to biomaterials with respect to changes in function or fate; and 5) the role of surface receptors in cell responses, including mammalian and microbial cell types.


Surface Characterization and Modification SIG

Some research areas that fall under these topics include polymer coatings, grafting, plasma polymerization/treatment, self-assembled coatings, thin film deposition, surface modifications such chemical and ion surface modifications; spectroscopic, microscopic, and biochemical surface characterization; device-tissue interactions, non-fouling surfaces, antimicrobial coatings, and other implantable medical devices.


Tissue Engineering SIG

Coming Soon!

Tissue Engineering


Development and Manufacture of Silk-based Tissue Engineered Devices: From Basic Systems to Clinical Use

In the symposium will be discussed topics like: New manufacturing methods to fabricate advanced silk-based systems; Aspects of silk behavior in vivo: degradation, integration, and regeneration (it should be great to have a presentation from a “clinical” side); Regulatory aspects (we can invite a person close to FA or NIH to explain open problems or difficulties in silk material commercialization); Silk on the market: examples of silk products already on the market: the long road to move silk from bench to the market.


Biomaterials for Regenerative Engineering Applications

Regenerative Engineering is the convergence of advanced materials science, stem cell and developmental biology, physical sciences, and clinical translation to develop innovative, scalable tools to regenerate damaged or diseased complex tissues and organs. This symposium will include presentations that describe how biomaterials inspired from the fields of nanotechnology, cell and molecular biology, and medicine can improve health. The session will cover how clinical translation may/should drive biomaterial design by fostering discussion among clinician/scientists, engineers, and representatives from companies with interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.


Biomaterials for Cardiovascular Regeneration

In recent years, significant effort has been devoted to developing efficient therapeutic strategies for repair and regeneration of cardiovascular injures. In this regard, biomaterials have played an imperative role in successful delivery of cells and therapeutic compounds as well as in engineering of native like cardiovascular tissue substitutes.

To develop proper treatment strategies for CVD, some of the challenges include vascularization of synthetic tissues, renewable cell sources, biomaterials that have similar features to the native cardiovascular tissues, and efficacy in preclinical models. In this session, we will include topics ranging from emerging biomaterials, strategies of vascularization of engineered constructs, and advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering that have shown progress in preclinical settings.


Biomaterial-Mediated Control of Immunity for Regenerative Medicine

Previous strategies to control biomaterial-immune cell interactions involved inhibition of or hiding from immunity. With increasing understanding of the importance of the immune system in mediating tissue repair, next-generation strategies are designed to actively stimulate specific immune cells or promote specific processes in the immune system in order to enhance tissue regeneration. This session will focus on biomaterial design and/or drug delivery strategies to actively control immunity for regenerative medicine applications. Cell targets include neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, and B cells. Biomaterial strategies include drug/cytokine delivery, structural biomimicry, nanomaterials, and tissue engineering strategies.


Next-Generation Biomaterials for Islet Delivery and Immune Acceptance for Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas are destroyed. Transplantation of pancreatic islet cells isolated from donors has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, this strategy is severely limited by islet loss due to inflammation, inadequate blood supply, and immune rejection. Biomaterial technologies are absolutely critical to the successful widespread application of islet transplantation in humans. This symposium will focus on novel biomaterials and technologies to improve islet survival and function. Examples include (i) new immune-directing encapsulating polymers, (ii) materials delivering immunomodulatory agents, and (iii) biomaterials addressing hypoxia, inflammation, and vascularization.